The following nonprofit organizations, headquartered in the Puget Sound region, have received capacity building grants from the Cedarmere Foundation. We invite you to visit their websites to learn more about the important work they do, both here in our community and around the world.

2015 Grant Recipients:

Click tab of grantee’s name for more information.

WHO WE ARE:

Families for Effective Autism Treatment of WA was established in 1996 by five visionary families determined to address unmet needs of parents and their children with autism. Today, nearly 3,500 care-givers, service providers, business partners and friends comprise our large, caring community.  We have 4 programs, 18 employees, 20 volunteers and an annual operating budget of about 1.5 million dollars.  To learn more about us, visit our website at www.featwa.org.

WHAT WE DO:

FEAT of WA’s primary mission is supporting children with autism and their families. Our programs include the following:

The Rising Star Academy is an early intervention program based on a data-driven, evidence based practice model called Applied Behavioral Analysis. Our learners are between the ages of 3 and 8. We offer small student/ teacher ratios, preparation for routine school interactions and adaptive, cognitive and social skill development opportunities.

Ben’s Fund grants provide relief from the tremendous financial burden of raising a child with autism.  Children gain access to a variety of therapies, therapeutic equipment, technology assistance and specialty camps that help them reach their full potential.  

The Experience Learning Project (ELP) is designed to help teens with high functioning autism, ages 13-21, improve their problem solving, self-management and communication skills within a community service learning environment. Typically developing high school volunteers participate in the group and provide peer modeling opportunities.  ELP also offers a monthly respite option that provides a fun, social and safe setting while parents receive a well needed break.

The Family Resource Line offers one-on-one support and the opportunity for newly diagnosed families to ask a question, receive guidance and learn about community resources and services.

RECENT SUCCESS:

At FEAT of Washington, we celebrate small miracles every day. Last year, children enrolled in the Rising Star Academy met 828 individualized goals often leading to more successful social interactions with their peers and mastering the first steps toward reading.  We awarded our 400th Ben’s Fund Grant since inception, our ELP teens provided 528 community service hours and 240 families reached out to our Resource Coordinator for help on their autism journey.

WHO WE ARE:

For 15 years, Mary’s Place has been offering homeless women and their children rescue, respite, nutrition, safety and shelter in a setting where relationships are affirmed, love and hope are discovered and a new future begins. Mary’s Place began as a program of the Church of Mary Magdalene, a nondenominational, ecumenical community of homeless and formerly homeless women who created the day center in response to homeless women’s need for a complete resource center. Mary’s Place obtained independent 501(c)(3 ) status in 2010 after 11 years of successfully providing social services to thousands of homeless women and their children in Seattle. In July of 2012, we moved to our new home at the Hope Center located at 9th and Stewart in Seattle. Our expanded space allows Mary’s Place to serve even more homeless women and children in crisis. In response to the increasing numbers of homeless families, Mary’s Place has opened four new family shelter programs in the last three years and expanded services for children and families at our day center. We currently have 43 employees. For more information, visit www.marysplaceseattle.org.

WHAT WE DO:

Consider including any or all of the following: your organization’s mission statement; a brief description of your organization; descriptions of up to three of your program areas; the community need you are addressing, the population(s) and/or geographic area you serve; and your organizational goals.

Mary’s Place empowers homeless women and children to reclaim their lives by providing shelter, nourishment, resources, healing and hope in a safe community. We work to:

  • Increase safety for homeless women and their children by providing for basic needs such as food, clothing, showers and laundry, emergency shelter, and referrals and assistance with applications for transitional and permanent housing.
  • Empower homeless women to make decisions that improve the health and well-being of their families by providing access to naturopaths, nursing and dental care; help them to identify needs and guide access to social and health services, drug treatment and counseling.
  •  Assist women in developing skills and resources to move themselves and their children off the streets and out of homelessness by providing groups and classes designed to develop self-confidence and self-esteem, provide financial empowerment, and access to resources for legal and financial aid, workforce training and employment.

In 2013, thanks to our community of supporters, we had a positive and transformational impact for thousands of women and children. Last year, we:

  •  Welcomed 2,335 people to our day center
  • Worked with 259 moms and 496 children
  • Provided 23,025 bed-nights of shelter to families
  • Received 32,473 visits to our day center
  • Served 96,991 meals
  • Provided 7,415 showers
  • Washed 2,682 loads of laundry

RECENT SUCCESS:

Josh was living with his son in a public restroom at a park, bolting the door and posting an ‘out of order’ sign to keep safe.  They are now at Bianca’s Place, our newest family shelter. Dad is returning to college in January. “When Mary’s Place called me and said we could stay I was overjoyed that we would no longer have to live in a public restroom. We are safe again.”

WHO WE ARE:

Seattle Works is the go-to community for using your time, skills, voice, and money in fun and interactive ways. Founded in 1989 by a group of twenty-somethings looking to give back to their community in a way that looked very different than their parents’ philanthropy, we continue to be the place where emerging leaders and local causes connect. Our annual operating budget is $512,000 with 4 FTE and 2 part-time staff.  Since 1989:

420,000 hours of volunteer service

52,000 individual volunteers

1,800 emerging leaders trained in board service

To learn more about us, visit our website at www.seattleworks.org.

WHAT WE DO:

From team-based volunteering to board leadership training, the impact of our community creates a ripple effect across the nonprofit sector. With a partner network of over 250 nonprofits, our volunteers engage with many unique missions and communities in Seattle.

We haven’t just managed to put people to work – over the years we have come to be known as a local and national thought leader on topics such as leadership development and volunteer engagement.

Core Programs:

Team Works: Teams of 15 volunteer one Saturday/month for a cycle of 4-months. After an afternoon of giving back, volunteers are encouraged to kick-back and socialize with their teammates at a lunch spot or bar afterwards.

The Bridge/The Bridge 201: Our award-winning board leadership series encourages young leaders to join nonprofit boards or public commissions. Taught by nonprofit professionals, participants actively learn about nonprofit governance, finance, leadership, and fundraising. Graduates can then participate in our interactive “Board Speed Dating” for immediate engagement with recruiting boards.

Hot Projects: A calendar of 1-day activities that allows volunteers to give back in ways that complement their own busy schedules.

Corporate fee-for-service: As an expert in creating custom volunteer projects, companies hire Seattle Works to manage team-building activities at nonprofits for 15-1,000+ employees.

RECENT SUCCESS:

June, 2014: Seattle Works was the proud recipient of HandsOn Network’s George W. Romney Affiliate Award of Excellence.

October, 2014: Seattle Works celebrated 25 years of impact in the community at our annual Swank Auction & Gala; $180,000 was raised by supporters as we continue to grow our impact and visibility in our community.

WHO WE ARE:

College Access Now (CAN) was founded in 2005 with a commitment to help motivated low-income high school students overcome barriers to accessing and pursuing college. Our grassroots beginnings started with volunteers serving 29 seniors at Garfield High School. We’ve since scaled to serve both juniors and seniors at six Seattle-area public high schools, and added a College Persistence Program in 2012 to continue supporting our students for up to six years through college graduation. CAN employs 13 full time staff who supervise 20 AmeriCorps members serving as college coaches in partner high schools and colleges. Our budget for the 2014-15 school year is $1.5 million. Learn more about us at www.CollegeAccessNow.org.

WHAT WE DO:

College Access Now (CAN) empowers students from low-income families to access, enroll, and graduate from college at rates equal to their more advantaged peers.  We pursue this mission through a continuum of College Access and Completion Programs, guided by the belief that all students, regardless of income or background, should have the opportunity to graduate from college.

In the 2014-2015 academic year, CAN is serving over 1,200 students – including 560 juniors and seniors at 6 Seattle public high schools, and over 650 students at colleges across Washington State and the country. 100% of CAN students are low-income, and most (94%) are the first in their family to pursue a college degree. Ninety six percent of CAN students identify as students of color and 69% of students are English Language Learners. Students join CAN’s program in their junior or senior year of high school where they participate in weekly after-school college readiness sessions, and receive personalized coaching and support by CAN’s on-site AmeriCorps College Coaches. CAN’s High School Program walks students step-by-step through college identification, standardized test preparation, and college, scholarship and financial aid applications. CAN currently supports students at the following six high schools: West Seattle, Chief Sealth International, Garfield, Franklin, Roosevelt, and Nathan Hale. After students graduate from high school, CAN continues to support them for up to six years through college graduation. Beginning the summer after high school graduation, our College Persistence team helps students transition smoothly to the college campus that’s right for them.  Through one-on-one coaching, we focus on connecting students to campus resources, improving financial support, and building relationships – ultimately, helping students build practical skills to be successful as a college student and professional. Until they throw their cap in the air, we’re here to help them succeed.

RECENT SUCCESS:

CAN students are accessing, enrolling, and persisting in college at a higher rate than their more advantaged peers. Without the right support, only 52% of low-income students nationally enroll in college, and only 11% graduate after 6 years. Participating in CAN significantly improves a student’s chances: on average, 97% of CAN students are accepted to college, 87% enroll within a year of high school graduation, and 87%* persist from year to year (*Class of 2012).

 

WHO WE ARE:

Washington Nonprofits (WN) is Washington’s state association for all nonprofits, founded in January 2010. Our mission is to build a strong, collaborative network of nonprofits serving Washington communities through advocacy, education and capacity building.  We believe that healthy communities are supported by healthy nonprofit organizations, and we implement programs that raise the knowledge, skill, and connections of nonprofits within communities and the sector as a whole.

Washington Nonprofits has four staff members spread across the state, including in Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, and Liberty Lake.  We operate with a budget of $498,000, supported through grants from large and small foundations, training fees, and conferences. To learn more, visit www.washingtonnonprofits.org.

WHAT WE DO:

Washington Nonprofits (WN) advances the nonprofit sector by connecting individual nonprofits to trainings, to each other through learning networks, and to the bigger cause in which they work through issue-based impact networks.  WN has three main programs aimed at strengthening the capacity of nonprofits to constructively engage in solving their communities’ most pressing problems.

Education:  WN builds nonprofit organizational capacity.  It maps areas of greatest need for nonprofits and then partners with local organizations in the support and creation of education and training initiatives that build nonprofit knowledge and skill.

Network building: WN builds community capacity by connecting organizations and individuals working in the nonprofit space to increase coordination and collaboration and accelerate the growth and success of their missions.  WN organizes an annual meeting for nonprofit support organizations and two conferences (Seattle and Spokane).

Public Policy: WN gathers together nonprofit voices from across the state and actively educates policy makers and the general public about nonprofits needs, strength and importance of the sector to our communities and our state.  WN organizes the nonprofit legislative caucus, provides a monthly newsletter related to nonprofits and public policy, and educates nonprofits about how to advocate.

Washington Nonprofits works across Washington State through a variety of initiatives.  It partners with local foundations and networks to produce trainings, such as in Grays Harbor, Chelan, and Yakima Counties.  It supports local nonprofit networks in places like Clark, Spokane and Whitman Counties.  It engages a cross-section on nonprofits from every corner of the state through member calls, webinars, and leadership circles.  It works with diverse partners—from government agencies to nonprofits and foundations – to connect, understand, and make actionable data describing the health of Washington communities, helping these partners work together toward common goals.  WN is a member of the National Council of Nonprofits, connecting federal nonprofit issues to our state and local communities.

RECENT SUCCESS:

In 2014, Washington Nonprofits celebrated its 3rd birthday.  It also produced 90 training events and two major conferences, moved forward an advocacy agenda, and launched the “Community Impact Project” using data to tell the social health stories of local communities.  It released “Finance Unlocked for Nonprofits (FUN),” an on-demand nonprofit finance learning tool for boards members.  In 2015, it will build on these successes, further implementing a strategy that advances the nonprofit sector towards healthier and more resilient Washington communities.

 

WHO WE ARE:

Team Read was founded in 1998 in response to a dire need to address the academic achievement gap in Seattle schools, specifically around developing reading skills for struggling young readers. Our program goals are to (1) help struggling 2nd and 3rd grade readers read at grade level following a year of tutoring by carefully trained teen tutors, and (2) provide teen tutors with meaningful work and volunteer experience supporting academic growth, leadership development and commitment to community service. Team Read provides 375 2nd and 3rd graders with one-on-one reading instruction each year. We have a staff of 3.75 FTEs and an annual operating budget of $550,000. To learn more about us, visit our website at www.teamread.org.

WHAT WE DO:

Team Read is an after school reading tutoring program with the mission of “Teens tutoring kids to achieve reading success.” Our innovative tutoring model taps into the compassion and commitment of teenagers who want to have a positive impact on the lives of children in their community who are struggling to become proficient readers.

Children living in poverty, especially children of color and English Language Learners, face especially profound challenges and they often need substantial support outside the classroom dedicated to developing their reading skills. Research demonstrates that it is critical for students to be reading at grade level by the end of 3rd grade. If they are not, their chances of ever reading at grade level are minimal. Students who are not able to read proficiently by the end of 3rd grade are 4-6 times more likely to leave school without a diploma than proficient readers.

Team Read serves 12 Seattle elementary schools with the greatest need for an extended day literacy intervention program. Working with elementary teachers, we identify the 2nd and 3rd grade students who face the greatest reading challenges. Students referred to the program are typically reading 1-2 years below grade level. They are paired with carefully screened and trained teen tutors who help them develop critical literacy skills—vocabulary, comprehension and fluency—and support them in guided reading practice. Tutoring pairs meet after school 2 days a week in tutoring sessions that are supervised by certificated teachers and structured to ensure that students maximize their reading time.

The goal of the program is for all 2nd and 3rd grade students to experience significant growth in their reading skills and to be reading at grade level by the end of the school year.

RECENT SUCCESS:

As a result of participating in Team Read:

  • 92% of teachers, 94% of parents report an increase in students’ reading skills.
  • 75% of parents report an increase in their child’s motivation to read.
  • 88% of parents report that reading is more fun for their child.
  • 86% of tutors report an increased sense of pride, accomplishment.

More than half of students jump 1.5+ grade levels in reading after 1 year of tutoring.

 

2014 Grant Recipients:

Art with Heart

Cocoon House

College Access Now (CAN)

FEAT of WA

Mary’s Place

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Seattle Works

Washington Nonprofits (WN)

Wayfind

2013 Grant Recipients:

Cocoon House

Hamlin Robinson School

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Team Read

Wayfind

2012 Grant Recipients:

Boyer Children’s Clinic

Hamlin Robinson School

Jubilee Women’s Center

KCCADV (King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Team Read

Wayfind

2011 Grant Recipients:

Boyer Children’s Clinic

Children’s Alliance

Family Law CASA

Hamlin Robinson School

Jubilee Women’s Center

KCCADV (King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

2010 Grant Recipients:

Children’s Alliance

Zeno

Family Law CASA

Jubilee Women’s Center

KCCADV (King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

Passages Northwest

Powerful Schools

Seattle Milk Fund

2009 Grant Recipients:

Chaya

Children’s Alliance

Zeno (formerly Explorations in Math)

Family Law CASA

HopeSparks

Passages Northwest

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Powerful Voices

2008 Grant Recipients:

Chaya

East African Community Services

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Powerful Voices

One By One

The Service Board

Seattle Milk Fund

Child and Family Guidance Center

2007 Grant Recipients:

Chaya

East African Community Services

One By One

PEPS (Program for Early Parent Support)

Powerful Voices

The Service Board